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Sunday School

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INTRODUCTION.


If you have never been faced with jealousy and betrayal, just keep on living trying to do the right things. It seems that when we are doing our very best to please the LORD, jealousy and betrayal will raise their ugly heads and these behaviors can come from the most unlikely people. It could be someone we considered to be a friend who betrays us, or a jealous co-worker who feels the need to move up at our expense. But probably the worst kind of betrayal is when it is done by a friend or family member. Moses faced such jealousy and betrayal in this week’s lesson. His brother and sister, Aaron and Miriam, attempted to revolt against his authority complaining about his marriage to a foreign woman. They may have had a reasonable complaint since Moses later taught that Israelites were not to marry foreigners (see Deuteronomy 7:1-3); and he married one himself (see Numbers 12:1). But the truth of the matter is that if their complaint was really their true concern, they could have brought it to Moses or to the council of elders he had recently formed (see Numbers 11:16-17) to resolve the issue. But instead of doing that, which would have been both the right and the wise thing to do, they demonstrated their jealousy and betrayal. This week’s lesson reveals that in reality, their complaint was merely a means to start a general rebellion against Moses as well as the LORD, with the aim of elevating themselves to positions of ultimate power by removing Moses as the nation’s leader.